Star Names:

Apus


Map of The Constellation of Apus
Please hover over any star to get more information
Apus is a constellation in the southern hemisphere, first documented in a 17th century celestial atlas included in Johann Bayer's Uranometria. The constellation was originally drawn by Dutch astronomer Petrus Plancius in the late 16th century, from the observations of Dutch explorers Pieter Dirkszoon Keyser and Frederick de Houtman. Plancius named it "Paradysvogel Apis Indica," the first word translating into "bird of paradise" and the other two meaning "Indian bee," with "apis" presumably mistaken for "avis," which is Latin for "bird." The mistake later resulted in two constellations being renamed. "Apis" ("the bee") was renamed to "Musca" ("the fly"), while "Avis Indica" became "Apus." In Greek, the constellation's name means "no feet" and it represents a bird of paradise, which were once believed to have no feet.

The Apus constellation occupies an area of 206 square degrees and does not contain any stars with known planets. It can be seen at latitudes between +5° and -90° and is best visible at 9 p.m. during the month of July.

Located near the South Pole, Apus has few visible features of interest. Globular cluster NGC 6101 lies just north of [229], gamma Apodis, and can be spotted with a 4.5-inch telescope when observed from an unlit location. IC 4499 is another young globular star cluster in the Milky Way, discovered only in 1901. Spiral galaxy IC 4633 is notable for an unusual nebular structure that surrounds it. It is also located inside the Milky Way.

The brightest star of the Apus constellation is [228], alpha Apodis, a K-type giant approximately 411 light-years distant from Earth. There are several other notable stars. Delta Apodis is a wide double star composed of [231], an M-type red giant and [235], an orange K-type giant. [230], beta Apodis, is a star system with an orange K-type giant for a primary. [229], gamma Apodis, is a yellow G-type giant. [239], theta Apodis, is an M-type red giant. [234], epsilon Apodis, is a blue-white B-type main sequence dwarf classified as a Gamma Cassiopeiae-type variable star. [238], kappa-1 Apodis, is a double star with a blue-white B-type subgiant and an orange K-type subgiant, and [242], kappa-2 Apodis, is another binary star, consisting of a blue-white B-type giant and an orange K-type main sequence dwarf.

Apus belongs to the Johann Bayer family of constellations, along with Hydrus, Dorado, Volans, Pavo, Grus, Phoenix, Tucana, Indus, Chamaeleon and Musca.

Constellation directly bordering Apus are Triangulum Australe, Circinus, Musca, Chamaeleon, Octans, Pavo and Ara.




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